THE BELLS WILL BE RINGING AT UNI

Carilloneur Robert Byrnes, at the keyboard.

Carilloneur Robert Byrnes, at the keyboard.

Learning to play one of only 180 instruments in North America is no small task; learning to play an instrument that is 100 feet tall with 47 bells is immense! A new festival starting on UNI's campus is giving students an extraordinary opportunity to do just that. The first-ever Midwest International Carillon Festival and Composers Forum begins today and gives UNI students an incredible opportunity to learn from five exceptional carillonneurs from around the world.

“This festival will enable us to learn more about the instrument and how to improve our technique. The rest of campus and the community will be in for a special treat,” said Tommy Truelsen, president of the UNI Guild of Carillonneurs and a junior music technology major at UNI. “This will be a great opportunity for any interested students on campus to learn more about this unique instrument and get the opportunity to see professionals from all over the world play our carillon.”

The festival will feature five exceptional carillonneurs from around the world presenting informational clinics and performances each day of the event. Performer-presenters include Karel Keldermans (St. Louis, MO, USA), Richard Strauss (Oakland, CA, USA), Stefano Colletti (Douai, France), Laura Ellis (Gainesville, FL, USA) and Peter Langberg (Logumkloster, Denmark).

All aspects of the festival are free and open to the public. The guest carillonneurs will perform at noon and 6 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday and at noon on Friday. They will also be giving lectures and master classes throughout the day on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

“The festival is an exciting and engaging experience for our students, and also a great way to get the UNI community involved in the music that's made at the top of our beloved Campanile” noted Caroline Francis, communications and operations coordinator in the School of Music. “Our student organization, the UNI Guild of Carillonneurs, was directly involved in the planning of this event and it was a remarkable opportunity for them to work so closely with these world-renowned artists.”

In addition to daily performances, lectures throughout the festival will cover topics including carillon music history in North America, Scandinavia and France, as well as notes on composing carillon music. UNI students are able to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn more about the special instrument housed in our own UNI Campanile.

For more information on the School of Music's visiting artists, festivals or performance schedule, contact Caroline Francis at (319) 273-2028, caroline.francis@uni.edu.

President Maucker, left, and T. Wayne Davis, right, with carillon additions and replacements, 1968.

President Maucker, left, and T. Wayne Davis, right, with carillon additions and
replacements, 1968.